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The A Ba Ka of Philippine Souvenirs: Ba for Barrel Man

C&C Travel Hub - Barrel Man

Souvenirs represent different sides and stories of a tourist destination. These are often colorful, creative, and fun reminders of places that are truly worth visiting and remembering. 

Continuing our journey through the “A Ba Ka” of souvenirs in the country, let’s look at what fun item “Ba” has for us.

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Ba for  Barrel Man

The Barrel Man is a wooden figurine that comes in many sizes. Some sell barrel man figurines that are as small as a thumb, while some have bigger sizes that are – well, as big as a barrel.

Barrel Man souvenirs are carved out of wood such as mahogany, pine, and kamagong, and are sealed off with varnish. Even though this figurine was originally used as a protest, as a souvenir, it shows the comical side of the highland natives, the crude carving fits the character of the funny figurine. The barrel man remains to be one of the tourist favorites when it comes to souvenirs.

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A complete Barrel Man figurine has three main components: the man with his arms tucked in the barrel, a barrel that’s removable from its place, and a “surprise” that will pop at you the moment you lift the barrel – Fun, huh? 

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Filipino Barrel Man! #barrelman #wood #nsfw

A post shared by J.R. Slattum (@jrslattum) on

Recently, malls have started selling barrel man figurines. Depending on the size and type of wood used, the figurines would cost around 400PhP to 1200PhP. 

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If you want to be “surprised” by this funny guy, head on over to the cool plateau of Baguio City. The city market and tourist spots around Baguio City have these figurines waiting for you. If you want to see the workshops, drop by the length of Asin Road, just by the boundary of the Summer Capital. 

Of course, there are other “Ba” souvenirs across the country, including bagoong from Pangasinan, barong Tagalog from different localities, bolero from Ilocos, and banig from Samar.



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